#Writing #MusicMonday: Life by Gregoire Lourme

CoverAfter making ten long albums of Free Culture soundtrack music in a very short period of time — only a couple of years — Gregoire Lourme released this, currently his latest, an extended meditation on Life.

And it feels like it might be a masterpiece.

It’s fifty-seven minutes, and by gum I wish it was longer. It’s a symphony, a celebration, an exuberant cry of joy to the universe. The Vangelis influence is quite clear, but so is, at times, that of Hans Zimmer. And yet, taking those influences, and likely others with whom I am unfamiliar, he creates something wholly new, and wondrous.

It is inspiration, in audio form.

Heck, I’m tempted to joke that I’m giving up Writing Music Mondays, because this can’t be topped.

Or maybe not to joke.

It is Just So Damned Good!

Download Life by Grégoire Lourme from the Internet Archive.


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Life by Gregroire Lourme is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

#Writing #Music Monday: Cinematic Volume 9: Horror and Dark Suspense by Grégoire Lourme

CoverGrégoire Lourme continues to produce amazing soundtrack music, and giving it Free Culture licenses. His early Cinematic releases tended to try to cover a broad swath of genres, but the more recent ones have become more focused, as with last month’s WMM album, Epic Choir.

Well, Volume 9: Horror and Dark Suspense is just as advertised. When I was trying to get the horror novel done in time for October publication (yeah, yet again, didn’t make it, that novel will be the death of me), this album worked perfectly to put me in the mental space for writing scenes of dread.

From the broken fairy tale opening of “Little Girl with Dark Hair” through the mounting dread of “Ad Vitam”, to the purposeful beat of “City of Crime”, every track hits those dark tones you need to set the mood for a really solid horror story.

Download Cinematic Volume 9: Horror and Dark Suspense by Grégoire Lourme free from the Internet Archive.


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Cinematic Volume 9: Horror and Dark Suspense by Grégoire Lourme is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

#Writing #Music Monday: Cinematic Volume 10 Epic Choir by Gregoire Lourme

CoverI’ve shared some of Gregoire Lourme’s soundtrack work before. He only gets better with each release, and this is his latest and arguably his best.

Cinematic Volume 10 is subtitled Epic Choir, and it is completely epic. You can’t listen to these tracks without imagining yourself on horseback, sword drawn, charging at hordes of undefeatable enemies.

I’m currently wrestling with a high fantasy novel (Ex-Ministers of Fate) that subverts the genre in a few ways, but when I downloaded and started playing this album, the wrestling became a bit less urgent, and the story worked with me a little more.

In fact, one of the tracks is going to be used in the book trailer, if I get my act together and actually make one. (The joy of Free Culture licensing — I already have the license to do this!)

It flows, it stirs the blood, it excites the soul.

If that’s what you need for your writing today, what the heck are you waiting for!?

Download Cinematic Volume 10: Epic Choir free from the Internet Archive.


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Cinematic Volume 10: Epic Choir by Gregoire Lourme is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 International License.

#Writing #Music Monday: Ambient Symphony by zero-project

[cover] zero-project - Ambient symphonyI am shocked and dismayed to discover that, apparently, I have never put stalwart Free Culture composer zero-project up in a Writing Music Monday post.

Allow me to rectify that grievous oversight.

Zero-project is a Greek composer and musician, and he (or she) has been putting out Attribution-licensed works for better than half a decade. He leans toward New Age music, but its complexity and depth makes up for the cheese factor, far more often than not.

Ambient Symphony is a very new-age-y piece, and yet I like it. (If you know me, you know that I pronounce “new age” to rhyme with “sewage” almost always.)

It’s melodic, not super-repetitive, and all nine tracks work together to create a coherent whole.

But be warned: the irritating tropes of New Age-y-ness are here. The echo effects, the nature sounds, the cheesy-synth, the whole bit. So if that automatically puts you off, now you know. If you think you can let the quality of this work get past your defenses on those fronts, however, give it a try. Because it is worth it.

Download Ambient Symphony free from Jamendo, or directly from Zero-project’s own site.


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Ambient Symphony by zero-project is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

#Writing #Music Monday: Trilhas Sonoras Para Filmes Vol. II

[cover] Emerson Antoniacomi - Trilhas Sonoras Para Filmes Vol. IIHere’s what I know about Emerson Antoniacomi: He’s Brazilian; he’s a talented composer and performer; and he released ten (ten!) freaking albums of Free Culture-licensed music from September to November 2010.

And that’s about it. Searching his name on DuckDuckGo, everything else seems to derive from his Jamendo page or his Jamendo blog, which hasn’t been active since 2011.

So we must focus on the album at hand. Trilhas Sonoras Para Filmes Vol. II (“Soundtracks for Films vol. II”) starts off with a two-part symphony (all synthesizer) that feels audacious, in some way I can’t quantify. This isn’t just a musician knocking out some generic background music, it’s more complete and layered than that.

The rest of the album could be taken as “just background music”, but it also manages to be more complex than you would expect.

If there is a drawback, it is that Antoniacomo seems not to be a sound geek, and lets his synth instruments sound… cheap, or possibly cheesy, I’m not sure quite how to describe it. There are moments that sound like bad soundtrack instrumentation for one of Roger Corman’s late-’80s straight to video production, attempting poorly to sound like a real instrument, instead of embracing its own sound. It’s only occasional, and the quality of the compositions overcomes the possible awkwardness, but it is there from time to time.

Download Trilhas Sonoras Para Filmes Vol. II free from Jamendo.


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Trilhas Sonoras Para Filmes Vol. II by Emerson Antoniacomi is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

#Writing #Music Monday: Songs From The Lake Air by Bert Jerred

CoverFourteen solid tracks of bluesy, vaguely-’80s-sounding goodness, and lyrics are all on the individual song pages, free to quote under a straight attribution license. What more could you possibly ask for?

Bert Jerred appears to be dedicated to increasing the volume of Free Culture music. He has three albums (at least), split betwen this one on Jamendo, and two others on Bandcamp, and they are all CC BY licensed. Which makes Jerred a mensch, in my book.

It does not hurt that he has chops, and that his music is very, very good.

Shake down the chambers of my skull, maybe;
soaked to my bones, the pain is dull, baby.
I see your Wall Street, and I raise you ninety-nine.

Don’t touch my children or I’ll get you, baby.
Touch my religion and I’ll hit you, maybe.
It’s Dharmapala on the phone and your freedom on the line:

So you say, “I don’t need a name;
I don’t need a name.”

So you say, “I don’t need a name;
I don’t need a name.”

That’s from his song “Anonymous“, the second track on this fourteen-track album.

Download, listen, and use the lyrics for inspiration in your next book.

Download Songs from the Lake Air by Bert Jerred free from Jamendo.


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Songs From The Lake Air by Bert Jerred is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Writing Music Monday: Fear by Adam Gordon

CoverHere’s an album I only just downloaded. Well, not true. I’d downloaded it a week or three ago, but hadn’t unzipped it and listened to it.

Then today came, and I was thinking “It’s Monday, I have to do a Writing Music Monday post, and I am just not in the mood.” I opened up Clementine, played a few tracks from artists I know I like in my playlist for potential Writing Music Monday shares, and even though most of it was good, I just wasn’t feeling it.

I’m like that. The wrong mood can keep me from not only enjoying, but actually experiencing in a meaningful way, things that I otherwise like.

So I went mucking about in my Music directory, and realized I had downloaded several albums that I had not yet unzipped and gotten into Clementine for a listen.

Which led, several steps later, to my thinking that I should post this.

I’m not going to say whether I like it or not, because I am so clearly In A Mood that my judgement today will certainly not apply to it later, at least in the sense of whether I’ll personally enjoy it or not.

What I will say is that Fear by Adam Gordon is weird. It marries things that ought not to go together well. Or at all.

And yet, it does all go together, if you allow for the artist intentionally playing with contrasts and conflicts among the tools he’s using. Looking at it from that perspective, it works.

The tags he put on the album for Jamendo include “electronic, soundtrack, ambient, orchestral,” and “dubstep”, and I would add in disco, edm, and probably a few other things that aren’t occurring to me right this moment.

It’s like ’80s synth crashed into ’00s techno dance music, careened off a film orchestra, and started leaking disco glitter balls. Which almost certainly doesn’t make any sense, but you go listen to it and see if you can describe it better.

Interestingly, there’s a healthy mix of purely synth instruments and real analog instruments. There’s only one synth of a real instrument that sounds bad, and that only briefly on the final track.

Gordon says of himself, on his website:

I’m a composer, guitarist, vocalist, traveller but for mostly a bass player. I used to play and record in Europe and USA over the years. I was honoured to collaborate with incredible and talented bands and performers[.]

You can download Fear by Adam Gordon from Jamendo.


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Fear by Adam Gordon is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.