#Writing #Music Monday: Trilhas Sonoras Para Filmes Vol. II

[cover] Emerson Antoniacomi - Trilhas Sonoras Para Filmes Vol. IIHere’s what I know about Emerson Antoniacomi: He’s Brazilian; he’s a talented composer and performer; and he released ten (ten!) freaking albums of Free Culture-licensed music from September to November 2010.

And that’s about it. Searching his name on DuckDuckGo, everything else seems to derive from his Jamendo page or his Jamendo blog, which hasn’t been active since 2011.

So we must focus on the album at hand. Trilhas Sonoras Para Filmes Vol. II (“Soundtracks for Films vol. II”) starts off with a two-part symphony (all synthesizer) that feels audacious, in some way I can’t quantify. This isn’t just a musician knocking out some generic background music, it’s more complete and layered than that.

The rest of the album could be taken as “just background music”, but it also manages to be more complex than you would expect.

If there is a drawback, it is that Antoniacomo seems not to be a sound geek, and lets his synth instruments sound… cheap, or possibly cheesy, I’m not sure quite how to describe it. There are moments that sound like bad soundtrack instrumentation for one of Roger Corman’s late-’80s straight to video production, attempting poorly to sound like a real instrument, instead of embracing its own sound. It’s only occasional, and the quality of the compositions overcomes the possible awkwardness, but it is there from time to time.

Download Trilhas Sonoras Para Filmes Vol. II free from Jamendo.


Creative Commons License
Trilhas Sonoras Para Filmes Vol. II by Emerson Antoniacomi is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

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“One-Eyed Dragon” by Cedar Sanderson

One-Eyed Dragon coverAs “One-Eyed Dragon” is a short-ish story, I don’t want to say too much about it.

It takes place in an unnamed Japanese village at an indefinite point in the past. We follow a tattoo artist who has lived there a short time, and is all but shunned by the villagers for reasons only ever hinted at. A small, mysterious lady comes into his shop and asks for an unusual tattoo. And that’s about all I can say without detracting from the delight that this story offers.

Sanderson’s writing is quiet, and she sets up all the elements of her story with perfect subtlety, all but effortlessly (to the eye of the reader, that is), so well that it makes this particular writer just a little jealous.

The other point that stood out for me is how well she evokes historical Japan. It’s not overt, just implied through detail and character interaction, but it is very effective and came off believably, though I’m not an expert in Japanese history. The only possible quibble is a reference to an artist with an obviously Chinese name (a real historical figure, as it happens, though Sanderson has distanced her story just a tiny bit by altering the spelling of the name), yet no mention is made by the character mentioning him that he is Chinese rather than Japanese. That an educated Japanese man would know about Chinese art does not a surprise, but that he would not make a distinction between the two cultures felt wrong to me. But again, I’m not an expert in Japanese culture or history, and the quibble is excruciatingly minor.

Even including that, I can’t recommend this story highly enough. It is lovely, just lovely.


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This review of “One-Eyed Dragon” by D. Jason Fleming is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

#Writing #Music Monday: Tiempos Pasados by J.Blasco

CoverJ.Blasco is another prolific Creative Commons musician, but he’s still active. (Really active — his last release was within the past three weeks.)

Yet, while he’s been active for a long time, I only recently listened to any of his work. And he’s good. He is so good, I’m giving you a new-age-y, smooth-jazz-y album and assuring you that, no, really, it’s worthwhile.

Oh, sure, it’s background music. But it’s superior background music, it has thought and wit and style behind it, instead of endlessly repeating loops.

The one track you may want to alter or remove is the penultimate one, “Sinfonia nÂș 2 J.Blasco”. It’s a lovely piece, IMO, but the ending is very odd, and abrupt. I’m reasonably sure that it was done purposely, but it is a bit jarring. But that’s only about thirty seconds on a track of six and a half minutes, and an album of over forty-seven minutes. Easily fixed/changed/ignored, and well worth everything else that comes with it, even so.

If you give yourself over to the mood of this album, I doubt you’ll regret it. It’s dreamy, moody, and very much worth writing to. Happy writing!

Download Tiempos Pasados by J.Blasco from Jamendo, or from the Internet Archive.


Tiempos Pasados by J.Blasco is released under a Free Art License 1.3 (FAL 1.3), also known as a Libre Art License (LAL).

This license is compatible with the Creative Commons Attribution–Share-Alike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0) license.